суббота, 22 октября 2016 г.

Опасайся занятого менеджера

Beware the Busy Manager
by Heike Bruch and Sumantra Ghoshal
FROM THE FEBRUARY 2002 ISSUE HBR

$$$
ключевой, на мой взгляд, момент:
Целеустремленные менеджеры хорошо осведомлены о выборах, которые они совершают, и они систематически расширяют зону своего контроля и свободы действий. Они управляют ожиданиями своего босса, находят пути независимого получения необходимых ресурсов, развивают отношения и влияние на людей и развивают компетенции, которые расширяют их пространство выбора и способность действовать.

Purposeful managers, by contrast, are acutely aware of the choices they can make—and they systematically extend their freedom to act. They manage their bosses’ expectations, find ways to independently access required resources, develop relationships with influential people, and build specific competencies that broaden their choices and ability to act.
$$$

For the past ten years, we have studied the behavior of busy managers in nearly a dozen large companies, including Sony, LG Electronics, and Lufthansa. The managers at Lufthansa were especially interesting to us because in the last decade, the company underwent a complete transformation—from teetering on the brink of bankruptcy in the early 1990s to earning a record profit of DM 2.5 billion in 2000, thanks in part to the leadership of its managers. We interviewed and observed some 200 managers at Lufthansa, each of whom was involved in at least one of the 130 projects launched to restore the company’s exalted status as one of Europe’s business icons.
Our findings on managerial behavior should frighten you: Fully 90% of managers squander their time in all sorts of ineffective activities. In other words, a mere 10% of managers spend their time in a committed, purposeful, and reflective manner.
***
After observing scores of managers for many years, we came to the conclusion that managers who take effective action (those who make difficult—even seemingly impossible— things happen) rely on a combination of two traits: focus and energy.
***
The Purposeful
The smallest proportion of managers we studied—around 10%—were both highly energetic and highly focused. Not only do such managers put in more effort than their counterparts, but they
also achieve critical, long-term goals more often. Purposeful managers tend to be more self-aware than most people. Their clarity about their intentions, in combination with strong willpower,
seems to help them make sound decisions about how to spend their time. They pick their goals— and their battles—with far more care than other managers do. Making deliberate choices can be a hard and sometimes painful process.
***
Perhaps the biggest difference between purposeful managers and the other types is the way they approach work. Other managers feel constrained by outside forces: their bosses, their peers, their salaries, their job descriptions. They take all those factors into account when they’re deciding what’s feasible and what isn’t. In other words, they work from the outside in. Purposeful
managers do the opposite. They decide first what they must achieve and then work to manage the external environment—tapping into resources, building networks, honing skills, broadening their influence—so that, in the end, they meet their goals. A sense of personal volition—the refusal to let other people or organizational constraints set the agenda—is perhaps the subtlest and most
important distinction between this group of managers and all the rest.

Beware the Busy Manager
by Heike Bruch and Sumantra Ghoshal
FROM THE FEBRUARY 2002 ISSUE HBR

Комментариев нет:

Отправить комментарий